Pregnancy 38 Weeks

Pregnancy 38 Weeks

This is the time of the pregnancy when the baby is considered “full term.” The baby is considered full term at 37 weeks, but the doctor may decide to deliver the baby earlier if there are any problems.

The baby is continuing to grow and put on weight. The baby’s skin is getting thicker and the baby’s eyes are opening. The baby’s nervous system is continuing to develop and the baby is starting to practice breathing.

The baby is ready to be born and will likely come sometime in the next two weeks. The doctor may decide to deliver the baby earlier if there are any problems.

Week 19 Pregnancy

Update



You’re halfway there! At this point, your baby is about the size of a butternut squash and is starting to develop some features that will be familiar to you later on. For example, the eyes are starting to form, and the ears are taking shape. The baby’s nervous system is also starting to develop, and the heart is pumping more and more blood.

The baby’s skin is still thin and transparent, but it will start to thicken and become less transparent in the weeks to come. The baby’s intestines are also starting to form, and the kidneys are starting to produce urine.

In terms of your own body, you may be starting to feel a bit more tired and you may be experiencing some Braxton Hicks contractions. You may also be experiencing some swelling in your hands and feet.

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Overall, things are going well and you’re making great progress!

2 Week Pregnancy Symptoms

The two-week wait is always the longest two weeks of your life. Especially when you are trying to conceive. You are anxious to find out if you are pregnant or not. And when you finally take the test, you are either overjoyed or completely devastated.

For the first two weeks of pregnancy, you may not experience any symptoms. Some women do experience symptoms such as nausea, fatigue, and bloating. But for others, they may not experience any symptoms until later in the pregnancy.

If you are trying to conceive, it is important to keep track of your menstrual cycle. This will help you to determine when you are most likely to ovulate. And if you are experiencing any symptoms, it will help you to determine if you are pregnant or not.

If you are pregnant, it is important to see your doctor for a prenatal appointment. This will help to ensure that you have a healthy pregnancy.

Pregnancy Hormones Week By Week

The hormones that are produced during pregnancy are essential for the development of the baby. The levels of these hormones increase as the pregnancy progresses.

During the first trimester, the main hormones involved are estrogen and progesterone. These hormones help to maintain the lining of the uterus, which is necessary for the development of the baby.

Estrogen is also responsible for the development of the baby’s sex organs. Progesterone helps to prepare the uterus for the implantation of the embryo.

During the second trimester, the main hormones involved are human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and estrogen. hCG is responsible for the development of the placenta.

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Estrogen is responsible for the development of the baby’s organs and tissues.



During the third trimester, the main hormones involved are hCG and progesterone. hCG is responsible for the development of the baby’s lungs. Progesterone is responsible for the development of the baby’s brain and nervous system.

Diarrhea Week 38 Pregnancy

Welcome to Diarrhea Week 38 of your pregnancy!

This week, you may experience a sudden and intense urge to use the bathroom. This is caused by the baby’s head pressing down on your bowel and bladder, which can lead to a sudden increase in pressure.

You may also find that you are passing more urine than usual. This is because your growing baby is putting more pressure on your bladder.

There is not much you can do to relieve the pressure, but you can try to avoid constipation by eating plenty of fibre and drinking plenty of fluids.

If you experience any discomfort or pain, or if you have any concerns, please speak to your doctor or midwife.







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