How Many Months Is 34 Weeks Of Pregnancy


How Many Months Is 34 Weeks Of Pregnancy?

Pregnancy is an incredible and life-changing experience. Pregnancies typically last 40 weeks, and the average is 38 weeks. A pregnancy is considered “full-term” when it reaches the 39th week of gestation. A pregnancy that lasts less than 37 weeks is considered premature.

34 Weeks of Pregnancy is About 8 Months Long

34 weeks of pregnancy is considered “late-term” and is approximately 8 months long. This means that the baby will be ready to join the world any time between 34 and 40 weeks of gestation. During this time the baby continues to develop, grow and prepare for life outside the womb.

Expectations for Babies Born at 34 Weeks

Babies born at 34 weeks gestation typically weigh between 5 and 6 pounds and are 18 to 20 inches long. They usually only need minimal medical attention before they can go home, and they usually catch up with their peers in speech, motor, and cognitive development by the age of two.



Medical Treatment for Babies Born at 34 Weeks

Babies born at 34 weeks are generally considered “late preterm” which means that their lungs may not be completely mature. Because of this, extra medical attention is necessary in order to ensure the baby’s safety. The baby may need to stay in the hospital for a few days in order to receive the necessary care. The doctor may order a breathing monitor and supplemental oxygen, but these treatments should only be necessary for a few days.

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Instructions for Care at Home

If your baby is born at 34 weeks gestation, your doctor will provide instructions for how to care for him/her at home. This may include monitoring the baby’s temperature, weight and respiration rate, as well as administering additional medication if necessary. It is important to follow the doctor’s instructions carefully in order to ensure the baby’s safety.

Postnatal Care for Mother and Baby

It is important to note that while the baby may have no medical issues immediately following birth, additional care is necessary in the weeks and months after birth. Both the mother and baby should have regular check-ups with the pediatrician in order to ensure that the baby is growing and developing normally.

In conclusion, 34 weeks of pregnancy is considered late-term, and is around 8 months long. Babies born at this stage are generally considered “late preterm” and thus may require additional medical attention and monitoring. With proper care and extra attention, these babies typically catch up with their peers in development by the age of two. After birth, it is important to ensure that both the mother and baby receive the necessary postnatal care.



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